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April 15, 2012

Stiff-Arm the Taxman with a Backdoor Roth IRA

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Stiff-Arm the Taxman with a Backdoor Roth IRA

Highly compensated earners still can’t make annual contributions to Roth IRAs – directly. However, 2010 gave them a loophole…

The origins of the Roth IRA go back to Newt Gingrich’s takeover of Congress back in 1994 and the “Contract with America,” where it was called the American Dream Savings (ADS) Account.

Unfortunately the plan was vetoed and never set into motion. However, two years later the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 was passed and allowed people to contribute to a Roth IRA plan for the first time ever in the year 1998. The new plan allowed workers to contribute after-tax dollars and have it grow tax deferred until they’re eligible to withdraw the money tax free.

The plan also came with two more benefits. Anyone who contributes to an IRA can roll it over to a Roth IRA, and the plan uses the current year’s income to determine eligibility of contribution or rollover.

However, many individuals were prevented from participating in the Roth IRA because of the stringent qualification requirements. The legislation decreed “highly-compensated” workers couldn’t contribute to Roth IRAs.

Was this Bill Clinton’s way of claiming a possible tax break for the middle class from this Republican legislation? That’s another article…

Anyway, let’s fast-forward to the present. Highly compensated earners still can’t make annual contributions to Roth IRAs – directly. However, 2010 gave them a loophole…

Two years ago, Congress allowed for the expiration of the $100,000 adjustable gross income (AGI) limit on Roth IRA conversions. This ended income limits on Roth conversions while leaving income limits on contributions in place. In effect, this change enabled anyone (regardless of income) to convert and/or contribute to a Roth IRA.

Why Should I Care Now?

Here are few reasons why converting to a Roth may be good for you:

  1. Roth contributions are made with after-tax money, but the earnings and all withdrawals in retirement are tax-free. So, a Roth provides a big tax break on the back end that a traditional IRA does not.
  2. Roth withdrawals aren’t included in determining how much of a retiree’s Social Security check is taxed under current law. Nor is how much in extra income-based Medicare premiums he/she has to pay.
  3. You must start taking minimum required distributions from a traditional IRA when you turn 70 and a half, but you don’t have to take any withdrawals from a Roth IRA.
  4. Further, you can leave the whole account to your offspring, who can then stretch out tax-free withdrawals over their own projected life spans.
  5. It especially makes sense for people who are younger, because they have more years of tax-free growth.

A Few Concerns Before Jumping In…

You may have heard that a Roth conversion usually means paying a big tax bill. Pulling all of those pre-tax and tax-deferred earnings out could mean a pretty substantial immediate hit.

If you want to limit any conversion tax hit, first roll the pre-tax dollars in your IRA (including pre-tax contributions and tax-deferred earnings) into your employer’s 401(k) plan.

Once that’s done, your IRA will hold only your after tax IRA contributions and possibly earnings on them, depending on whether your 401(k) will take such earnings. Make new after-tax contributions for 2011 and 2012, and then convert at little or no-tax cost.

You probably want to check with your employer sponsored plan about this, but the majority do allow for the roll-in of IRA money. With tax rates and reform on the legislative table, this may be an option to seriously consider.

Good Investing,

Jason Jenkins

Article by Investment U

April 14, 2012

US dollar strengthens against all the majors

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By TraderVox.com

Tradervox (Dublin) – Euro continued its slide even during the US session and printed a fresh low of 1.3250. There is a downside pressure on the single currency as the GDP data from US came as expected which reveals GDP at the expected value of 3%. Euro is trading around 1.3260, down about 0.60% for the day.

The support may be seen at 1.3250 and below at 1.3200 levels. The resistance may be seen at 1.3280 and above at 1.3325. Gross domestic purchases index was also came at 0.9% and real personal consumption expenditures came at 1.3%. Both data came in line with the expectation.

The Sterling Pound has recovered from the lows of the day and now has come above the 1.5900 levels. The cable is now trading around 1.5911, up about 0.15% for the day.The support may be seen at 1.5880 and below at 1.5850. The resistance may be seen at 1.5940 and above at 1.5980.
 
The USD/CHF as expected is showing the US dollar strengthening move as it approaches the 0.9100 levels. The high so far is 0.9091printed during the late European session. The pair is currently trading around 0.9083, up about 0.37% for the day. The resistance may be seen at 0.9100 and above at 0.9140. The support may be seen at 0.9050 and below at 0.9020.
 
The USD/JPY is regestering a recovery after forming a low of 81.89 during the late European session. Presently it is beig quoted at 82.33, down about 0.67% for the day. The support may be seen at 82 and below at 81.50. The resistance may be seen at 82.40 and above at 82.90.
 
There seems to be no respite for the Australian dollar as it is being punished during the US session as well. It has printed a fresh low of 1.0302 during the US session and break of the 1.0300 level is very much possible. Australian dollar is trading around 1.0317, down about two third of a percentage for the day. The support may be seen at 1.0280 while the resistance may be seen at 1.0320 and above at 1.0370.
 
US dollar index is trading around 79.42. 

Disclaimer
Tradervox.com is not giving advice nor is qualified or licensed to provide financial advice. You must seek guidance from your personal advisors before acting on this information. While we try to ensure that all of the information provided on this website is kept up-to-date and accurate we accept no responsibility for any use made of the information provided. Opinions expressed at Tradervox.com are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Tradervox.com or its management. 

Article provided by TraderVox.com
Tradervox.com is a Forex News Portal that provides real-time news and analysis relating to the Currency Markets.
News and analysis are produced throughout the day by our in-house staff.
Follow us on twitter: www.twitter.com/tradervox

More Restructuring May Be Needed For Greece

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By TraderVox.com

Tradervox (Dublin) – The Head of Sovereign Ratings at Standard & Poor’s, Moritz Kraemer has indicated that Greece might require another debt restructuring that will include the bailout partners such as the IMF and the European governments. Kraemer went ahead to state that Greece bailout will have to include its official creditors again. This statement have come at a time when the new government bonds offered by the Greece government are performing adding to the speculation in the market that the debt crisis in Greece might be far from over.

Maritz Kraemer was talking at the London School of Economics where he was accompanied by IMF mission chief to Greece, Paul Thomsen. At this event, Thomsen indicated that despite the drastic changes done on Greece fiscal structure, it might take up to a decade to wholly complete the reforms. On March 21, the acting Greece Prime Minister Lucas Papademos secured a parliamentary approval to pave way for the 130 billion-euro bailout package.

Concerns about the future of Greece are coming at a time when the country is set to go into an election set to any day from next month. Thomsen talking about the election in the country indicated that after the election the country will have to reduce its fiscal deficit and expressed doubt on the timeline of Greece’s return to the market.

These comments are coming at just a day to the euro area Finance Ministers meetings to be held on Friday 30. Despite these negative reports, the market is upbeat on the formation of a stronger financial firewall. Thomsen said there is doubt as to when Greece will return to the market as a result of the great amount of risk associated with the restructuring and the possible resistance to the program.

The euro has continued to increase against the dollar and the pound as investors wait for the results of tomorrow’s meeting. The euro rose by 0.1 percent against the US dollar trading at 1.3334.

Disclaimer
Tradervox.com is not giving advice nor is qualified or licensed to provide financial advice. You must seek guidance from your personal advisors before acting on this information. While we try to ensure that all of the information provided on this website is kept up-to-date and accurate we accept no responsibility for any use made of the information provided. Opinions expressed at Tradervox.com are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Tradervox.com or its management. 

Article provided by TraderVox.com
Tradervox.com is a Forex News Portal that provides real-time news and analysis relating to the Currency Markets.
News and analysis are produced throughout the day by our in-house staff.
Follow us on twitter: www.twitter.com/tradervox

April 13, 2012

Central Bank News Link List – 29 March 2012

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Here's today's Central Bank News link list, click through if you missed the previous central bank news link list.  Remember, if you want to submit links for inclusion in the daily link list, just email them through to us or post them in the comments section below.

  • Brazil central bank sees lower inflation, selic rate (Market News International)
  • BRICS launch criticism against G7 monetary policy (fin24)
  • ECB prevents chaos, but fails to promote lending (Financial Times)
  • Rising bad loans at China banks seen as manageable (CNBC)
  • National Bank of Kazakhstan cuts rate to 6.50% (Central Bank News)
  • Belarus central bank cuts rate 200bps to 36.00% (Central Bank News)
  • Morocco central bank cuts rate 25bps to 3.00% (Central Bank News)
  • Who captured the Fed? (New York Times)
  • Myanmar (Burma) to float its currency, the Kyat (The Irrawaddy)
Source: www.CentralBankNews.info

April 12, 2012

Banca Nationala a Romaniei Cuts Rate 25bps to 5.25%

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The Banca Nationala a Romaniei reduced its key monetary policy interest rate by another 25 basis points to 5.25% from 5.50%.  The Bank said: “The NBR restates that achieving both price and financial stability, in the context of fulfilling the commitments under the external financing arrangements with the EU, the IMF and other international financial institutions, is essential for ensuring lasting economic growth. Increased absorption of European funds along with a gradual revival of domestic demand will secure a sustainable economic recovery.”

Previously the Bank also cut the rate 25 basis points in November and at its February and January meetings this year, prior to that its last move was a 25 basis point cut in May 2010.  Romania reported annual consumer price inflation of 2.6% in February, down from 3.44% in November, compared to previous readings of 3.45% in September, 4.25% in August, 4.85% in July, 7.9% in June, 8.4% in May and 8.3% in April 2011, and now within the Bank’s inflation target range of 3% plus or minus 1%.


The Romanian economy expanded 1.8% in Q3 2011 (0.2% in Q2), placing annual growth at 2.6% (0.3% in Q2).  Romania’s currency, the Romanian Leu (RON), has weakened about 5% against the US dollar over the past year, while the USDRON exchange rate last traded around 3.30.

www.CentralBankNews.info

April 11, 2012

Bank of Albania Cuts Interest Rate 25bps to 4.25%

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The Bank of Albania dropped its main monetary policy interest rate another 25 basis points to 4.25% from 4.50% previously.  The Bank said [translated]: “the Supervisory Board decided to reduce by 0.25 percentage point interest rate, by deducting the 4.25% level. This decision aims to create appropriate monetary conditions for meeting the inflation target over the medium term. Meanwhile, monetary policy easing provides greater support for development of private sector demand in the economy.”


The Bank of Albania has now cut the interest rate three times (including 25 basis points in October, and December) since it previously raised the interest rate by 25 basis points to 5.25% at its March meeting last year.  Albania reported annual inflation of 0.6% in February,  down from 1.7% in December, 3.1% in August, 4.2% in May, and 4.5% earlier in February last year, and now below the Bank’s 3% inflation target.  

The IMF previously estimated Albania’s economy would grow 2.7% 2011, while the government had hoped for 5% GDP growth; Albanian economic growth was 2.3% in 2010.  Albania’s currency, the Lek (ALL) has weakened by about 3% against the US dollar over the past year; the USDALL exchange rate last traded around 105


www.CentralBankNews.info

April 10, 2012

Why Spain’s Economy is the Next Big Problem for the Eurozone

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By MoneyMorning.com.au

It’s not often that I feel sympathy for a politician.

But you have to feel for Spain’s prime minister, Mariano Rajoy. Three months into his government, and he’s facing a general strike from the unions on the one hand, and a potential buyers’ strike from investors on the other.

The unions are striking because they’re fed up with economic reform that might reduce their power. Investors are threatening to stop buying Spanish government debt because they want even more reform.

What’s a prime minister to do? And more importantly, what does his dilemma mean for you?

Spain – The Weakest Link in the Eurozone

Spain’s economy – more so than Italy’s – has always been the major fault-line in the eurozone.

Sure, Greece causes a lot of noise and commotion. There was always the chance that Greece would throw a hissy fit and pull out of the euro unilaterally. Better-behaved small countries like Portugal and Ireland barely warrant a mention in the papers these days.

Even so, people always knew that in terms of size, Greece by itself didn’t matter. It was the knock-on impact that everyone worried about. The big fear was always that the market would say to itself, “If Greece can go bust, maybe it will be someone who matters next time.”

So the point of all the bail-out packages wasn’t so much to save the smaller countries. It was to prevent fears about the small countries from spreading to the “too big to fail” ones.

For a short while, it seemed as if the European Central Bank’s LTRO (Long-Term Refinancing Operation) had done the job on that score. Now it’s starting to look as though that was over-optimistic.

Investors are fretting about Spain again. The government’s cost of borrowing over ten years has risen by around 0.5 percentage points since the start of this month.

The trouble is, Spain missed its 2011 budget deficit target (in other words, it ended up overspending by even more than expected). As a result, it set itself a softer target for 2012.

Markets don’t like to see this sort of target slippage. For now, they don’t care so much when it’s the US or the UK. Those countries have their own currencies and central banks who are prepared to print as much money as it takes to pay off their creditors.

Europe isn’t prepared to do that (although it might be getting closer to doing so). And as private investors in Greek debt have discovered to their cost, there’s no guarantee that a eurozone country with problems will make good on its debts. So naturally, investors are warier of European government debt than perhaps they once were.

Spain’s Big Economic Problems
– Debt and Unemployment

The Spanish economy’s big problem is private sector debt, which might end up on the government’s balance sheet. Spain had a massive property bubble. The fall-out from that bubble continues. Prices haven’t been allowed to fall as far as they really need to. And that means no one can be sure just how much bad debt is still sitting on the banks’ books.

When banks don’t know just how bad a state their balance sheets are in, they stop lending. That makes it even harder to dig an economy out of trouble.

Spain’s economy also has the usual European problem of overly restrictive labour laws that discourage hiring. This is something the government is trying to tackle. The general strike today is partly about an overhaul of labour rules. A new bill passed in February makes it easier to cut wages, reduces the power of the unions, and could cut the cost of firing staff.

Given that unemployment is standing at 23%, and an incredible 50% among young people, you have to wonder who’s left to go on strike. As one Spanish political communications professor tells Bloomberg, the unions “have a lot at stake as Spanish society is very much questioning their role… [They] don’t represent the unemployed.”

This is one of the rarely-appreciated benefits of having a ‘hard currency’ like the euro. When it’s harder to take the easy way out (allowing your currency to weaken) then sometimes you are forced to take genuinely tough measures to change the way your economy works.

Of course, the trouble is that it takes a strong government to cope with the resulting social upheaval. And if your economy is in such a deep hole that people don’t get to see the benefits of reforms, only the pain, then it’s even harder to push reform through.

So What Happens Next for Spain?

Spain’s economy can’t be allowed to go bust. And it won’t be. We’re going to see the usual back and forth about bail-out funds and arguing between the Germans and the rest of Europe. But the most likely outcome still seems to be some form of European quantitative easing. The ECB has already taken a pretty big step in that direction with the LTRO.

But what does all this mean? The short answer is that the future for Europe holds continued loose monetary policy, and a banking system in many countries that’s largely reluctant to lend.

John Stepek

Editor, MoneyWeek (UK)

Publisher’s Note: This is an edited version of an article that first appeared in MoneyWeek (UK).

From the Archives…

A Better Inflation Bet Than Gold?

2012-03-23 – Kris Sayce

3D Printing: How “Desktop Factories” Will Create the Next $1 Trillion Industry

2012-03-22 – Michael Robinson

How to Invest in the Fastest-Growing Energy Business of the 21st Century

2012-03-21 – Aaron Tyrrell

Why You Should Build Your Wealth Using the Biggest BRICS Possible

2012-03-20 – David Thomas

Oil Getting Ready For Its Next Rally

2012-03-19 – Dr. Alex Cowie

For editorial enquiries and feedback, email letters@moneymorning.com.au


Why Spain’s Economy is the Next Big Problem for the Eurozone

April 9, 2012

How a ‘Venezuelan Spring’ Could Push Down Oil Prices

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By MoneyMorning.com.au

Political risk is being blamed for driving up oil prices. The looming threat of Iran, the constant risk of further money-printing by central banks, and concerns over unrest in Saudi Arabia are three that we’ve covered.

However, it’s worth pointing out one political risk that – in the longer run – could end up making crude oil cheaper. We’re talking about Venezuela.

Hugo Chavez is sicker than previously thought. This could force him to stand down – creating a power vacuum. And even if he continues in office, he could lose the election in October.

Chances are, any change in government could result in a major boost for oil production in Venezuela. It might even help to curb the power of both Iran and Saudi Arabia. Here’s why.

A Tale of Two Economies

The experience of Brazil shows how developing countries can take advantage of a commodity boom. In the last decade, Brazil has paid down its debts, becoming a net creditor. It has also invested in roads and ports.

This has led to a virtuous circle of increased economic growth, rising living standards and increased foreign investment. Adjusted for prices, Brazil is now the ninth largest economy in the world. Towards the end of last year, credit rating agency Standard & Poor’s upgraded its debt.

Venezuela has done exactly the opposite. Since Chavez came to power in 1999, he has wasted oil revenue buying votes and supporting countries such as Syria and Cuba. His decision to take 300 private companies into public ownership – many without compensation – has scared investors away.

The oil industry has been hit hard by Chavez’s policies. Not only did he reverse plans to let the private sector have a greater role, he raised production taxes and fired a large number of oil workers for political reasons – starving the state oil company of talent.

The ‘Chavez effect’ on oil production is easy to demonstrate: in 1998, when the price of crude oil hit a low of under $11 a barrel, Venezuela produced 3,167,000 barrels of crude oil a day. Twelve years later, despite record prices, output was only 2,090,000 barrels a day – nearly a third lower.

Could Chavez Step Down?

Despite these economic failures, Chavez was re-elected in 2000 and 2006. He runs what some call a ‘soft dictatorship’. Although the law allows free speech and free elections, these rights do not exist in practice.

Those who speak out against the regime may lose their jobs or have their firms taken over by the state. Critical papers and TV stations have been banned. Voters also face intimidation while the opposition has been heavily divided. This has made it hard to effectively challenge Chavez.

However, these things may be about to change. The opposition has finally united behind a single candidate, Henrique Capriles. Despite high levels of official pressure, huge numbers of people turned out to vote in the opposition primary.

More importantly, Chavez may not make it to the election. Last year doctors found that he had cancer. Ray Walser of the Heritage Institute tips henchmen Diosdado Cabello, Rangel Silva and Adan Chavez – Hugo’s brother – as possible replacements. But Andrew Cawthone of Reuters believes that “none of the figures around him has his charisma, political and rhetorical skills.” Overall, says Walser, “if Chavez dies, I think the chances are good for a reformist. Even if he does not I think we could see the Bolivarian movement self-destruct.”

Of course, even if Chavez dies or loses the election there is a chance that his cronies could still cling to power. In 2002, a popular uprising forced him out of office, only to see pro-Chavez forces remove his successor from power. Since then Chavez has put his supporters in key military positions. He has also devolved power to political militias, and worked with Russia, China and even Iran to arm himself to the teeth. A civil war could stop all output – increasing the price of crude.

It’s All About the Long Run

Even if Chavez goes in October, there will be little short-term impact on oil prices. When he leaves office, the state firm PDVSA is also likely to be sued over the seizure of assets in 2008 and 2009, delaying any investment. Foreign firms are likely to hold back until the political situation has calmed down.

However, the ability of a free Venezuela to lower oil prices in the long run is huge. The US Energy Information Agency (EIA) thinks that Venezuela has the second largest levels of proven reserves in the world. Oil cartel Opec even claims that it could have more crude oil than Saudi Arabia.

A committed private sector player could even find the huge amount of sea oil that is not currently viable. This would bring the total amount up to 513 billion barrels.

Clearly, this isn’t a story that will have an instant impact on investors. But in the long run, Venezuela could be a ‘game-changer’ for oil prices. We’ll be keeping a close eye on it and watching for potential opportunities.

Matthew Partridge

Contributing Editor, MoneyWeek (UK)

Publisher’s Note: This is an edited version of an article that first appeared in MoneyWeek (UK).

From the Archives…

A Better Inflation Bet Than Gold?

2012-03-23 – Kris Sayce

3D Printing: How “Desktop Factories” Will Create the Next $1 Trillion Industry

2012-03-22 – Michael Robinson

How to Invest in the Fastest-Growing Energy Business of the 21st Century

2012-03-21 – Aaron Tyrrell

Why You Should Build Your Wealth Using the Biggest BRICS Possible

2012-03-20 – David Thomas

Oil Getting Ready For Its Next Rally

2012-03-19 – Dr. Alex Cowie

For editorial enquiries and feedback, email letters@moneymorning.com.au


How a ‘Venezuelan Spring’ Could Push Down Oil Prices

April 8, 2012

How You Can Profit from an Unexpected End to the Energy Crisis

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By MoneyMorning.com.au

For years, the United States has feared an energy crisis.

That one day the U.S. would have to import nearly all its oil and gas from overseas.

If there was a disruption to the supply lines, it would lead to rising fuel prices and severe shortages. That would mean higher costs for businesses. And higher prices for consumers.

All of which could push the world’s biggest economy into recession. And cause mass civil unrest.

It would be the 1970s “oil shock” all over again. But this time… it would be much worse…

Energy Crisis Over?


But, despite those fears, the U.S. energy crisis never really happened.

Why?

Well, it may seem counter-intuitive, but it’s thanks to $100 oil.

That’s not something you’ll read anywhere in the mainstream press. But it’s true.

When oil prices were low, it was too expensive for explorers and producers to reach hard-to-get oil reserves. And the harder it is to get, the tighter the supply. And the more the West had to rely on the Middle East.

That was just fine for the Middle East oil cartel. It had plenty of easy-to-get oil.

And when oil prices soared from 2001 onwards, it seemed as though it would provide riches to the Middle East, while dooming the West (especially America) to economic depression.

In fact, some have argued the crash in 2008 was partly due to high energy costs. That may be true.

But sometimes it’s hard to look past the short term and focus on the long term. Short term, a high oil price was great for Saudi Arabia, Iran and the rest of OPEC. But it wasn’t great for the U.S. and the West.

But in the long term, the opposite will be true.

In fact, we believe the high oil price of the past 10 years has actually secured America’s energy future. And soon, it could do the same for the rest of the Western world too…

The Energy Future for Investors

You see, while high oil prices have caused short-term pain, long term it means hard-to-get energy reserves became viable.

This is where entrepreneurial and risk-hungry energy companies have started to exploit the high oil price.

In the U.S., this has mostly happened with the exploration of shale oil and shale gas reserves. 20 or 30 years ago, these resources were too expensive to consider.

That’s changed. To the extent that according to global energy giant, BP, the U.S. is set to be energy self-sufficient by 2030. And soon after it will become a net energy exporter.

That’s an amazing shift from where the U.S. was just a few years ago.

And so now, the race is on to sideline Middle Eastern influence in energy markets.

You see, while a high oil price is good news for big producers in the Middle East, it’s also bad news. Simply because a high oil price makes other projects viable.

And that means more price and supply competition. It explains why Saudi Arabian oil minister, Ali al-Naimi is so keen to make sure the market still knows who’s in charge.

As Bloomberg News reports:

“Saudi Arabia said it could potentially raise output capacity to 15 million barrels a day, from 12.5 million barrels a day, using new oil fields if needed.”

That’s all talk.

Saudi Arabia doesn’t really want to knock down the oil price. It just wants to make investors, explorers and producers think it can knock down the price.

Because while lower oil prices are actually better for the Middle East in the long term (because it makes competing oil fields less viable), in the short term, Middle East dictators like high oil prices because they can buy more trinkets (football teams, London and New York property, and so on).

And because they’re afraid of what could happen if prices fall and they can no longer afford the handouts they’ve promised their oppressed citizens.

Under-Explored East Africa


The effect is that explorers are pushing the boundaries of the exploration frontier. For years, when oil was just USD$20 per barrel, certain areas of the world were no-go zones. They were politically unstable…geologically inaccessible… or just plain not worth the risk.

But with oil at USD$100 per barrel, the reward has started to offset the risk. Of course, it’s still risky. Very risky.

But the risk is now worth taking. Norwegian oil company, Statoil is exploring in an almost untouched area – the east coast of Africa. To highlight just how risky it is, Statoil has hired armed security guards to patrol its offshore assets to protect them from pirate attack!

But even machine-gun toting pirates can’t keep the explorers away.

And why would they? The east African coastline is almost completely unexplored when it comes to oil and gas.

That’s highlighted by these amazing numbers from U.K-based explorer and producer, Afren plc…

low relative drilling coverage


Source: Afren plc

For every 70 wells drilled in North, West and Central Africa, only one well has been drilled in East Africa.

Oil company, Africa Oil, makes a similar comparison. This time comparing the triangle of Kenya, Somalia and Ethiopia with the North Sea and the Suez Basin:


Source: Africa Oil Corp

Fewer than 200 wells drilled, compared to 7,706 for the North Sea and Suez Basin. That’s just 2.5% the number of the wells drilled, in an area 10-times larger!

Despite the risks (including from pirates), exploring this untouched frontier is already starting to pay off. As the Financial Times recently reported:

“Statoil set the oil industry abuzz late last month when it announced it had found large volumes of natural gas off the coast of Tanzania, confirming east Africa’s reputation as one of the energy world’s most promising new frontiers.”


The Biggest Energy Shake-Up in 20 Years


The idea of frontier energy plays (whether it’s a geographical or technological frontier) is something we’ve focused on in Australian Small-Cap Investigator.

The idea that explorers and producers are doing things and going places that could shake up the entire world energy market.

This is attractive, because as a speculative investor, you want to be at the turning point of change. Because if you can identify a change in direction early – or as it happens – that’s where you can potentially make your biggest returns.

And as we see it, one of the biggest changes in direction is happening in energy markets right now. If you’re quick, there’s still time to get involved.

How?

We’re preparing a special report on the subject. So look out for it over the next couple of weeks.

Cheers.

Kris.

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April 7, 2012

Forex CT 30-3-12 Market Update & Outlook

Filed under: Forex News — Tags: , , , , — admin @ 3:10 am

Video courtesy of ForexCT – A leading Australian forex broker, liscensed by the Australian Securities & Investments Commission, offers the MetaTrader4 and PROfit Platform to retail traders. Other services include Segregated Accounts, Trading workshops, Tutorials, and Commodities trading.

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